Oatmeal + Honey + Goat’s Milk Soap Recipe

By Lisa Maliga, copyright 2011-2016

 

labreatarpitssoap
Oatmeal + Honey + Goat’s Milk Soap

This is my favorite soap to make as it’s so good for one’s skin and is gentle enough to use for a facial soap. the following recipe is from my eBook, THE JOY OF MELT AND POUR SOAP CRAFTING.

 

Oatmeal + Honey + Goat’s Milk Soap

Ingredients:

16 ounces white soap base
1/4 cup ground oatmeal [rolled oats, not instant oatmeal]
1 teaspoon organic honey
1 teaspoon powdered goat’s milk
1 teaspoon vanilla fragrance
OR oatmeal, milk & honey fragrance [optional]

Mold:

4 four-ounce molds

Instructions:

Slice up soap base into small cubes and melt. If not using goat’s milk base, add the powdered goat’s milk. Just before it’s fully melted add oatmeal and honey. Stir well. Add fragrance and remove from heat. When soap is just starting to form a layer, pour into molds. Spritz away any bubbles with rubbing alcohol. Allow soap to harden in fridge, freezer, or remain at room temperature. Remove from molds. Make sure soap is at room temperature before wrapping. Wrap in cling wrap and label. 

the joy of melt and pour soap crafting by lisa maliga
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Oatmeal Note: The above method will create a soap bar with oatmeal on one side only. To make Oatmeal+Honey+Goat’s Milk with the oatmeal suspended throughout the soap, you must stir in the oatmeal, turn off the crock pot OR double boiler, and stir occasionally for approximately 5-10 minutes while the soap mixture thickens. 

eBook link: https://lisamaliga.wordpress.com/nonfiction-books/the-joy-of-melt-and-pour-soap-crafting

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Tropical Paradise Melt & Pour Soap Recipe

By Lisa Maliga, © 2015

tropicalsoapgroupWhen I go to a party store and see the vibrant luau section, I always want to buy the tiki lamps, hula skirts, leis, colorful napkins and paper plates and throw a big party. Doesn’t matter what time of year, it represents that perpetual summer—which can be good if you like warm weather and tropical scenes.

I decided to create a fun recipe to share with you. When the soaping bug hits, it hits hard and this’s the result. Tropical Paradise is a little more involved than a basic single pour method, but not much. Plus, the results are more 3-D!

I chose white soap base as that’s what I had on hand and I wanted a pastel colored theme rather than neon colors. Of course, you can use clear soap base and have a more dramatic looking contrast between clear soap and bright green or whatever color you choose mini palm tree embeds.

Both molds came from the discount store and cost $1 each. One is a storage container; the other is a plastic ice cube tray. Pictured here are the ingredients including, from left to right: containers of mica, white soap base, ice cube tray, and storage containers. The colorful tropical themed napkin is sold in a package of 20. The napkin can be used for wrapping but only after the soap has first been wrapped in cling wrap–otherwise the colors will run.

Ingredients:

1 pound white or clear soap base

Green mica

Pink mica

1 teaspoon tropical type fragrance oil [mango, coconut, pineapple, orange, tropical blend, etc.]

Molds:

3 oval or rectangular molds [4 oz each]

8 cavity mini palm tree molds [approx. 2 oz total]

tropicalsoaptreesInstructions for Palm Tree Mold:

Slice the soap base into small cubes. Just before the soap is fully melted, add the colorant. Adding fragrance to them is optional. Stir well. Slowly pour into the molds. Spritz away bubbles with rubbing alcohol. Allow soap to harden in fridge, freezer, or remain at room temperature. Remove from molds. This soap will solidify within minutes. Remove and set aside.

NOTE: If you live in an area with low humidity, it’s best to allow this soap to freeze so that it’ll be even easier to keep the little soap inserts/embeds from melting when pouring the second layer.

Instructions for Oval/rectangular Mold:

Prepare your molds by placing one to three of the mini palm trees on the bottom.

Slice up soap base into small cubes and melt. Stir well and add colorant. Add fragrance. Don’t pour it when it’s too hot, make sure it’s cooled down so it won’t melt the mini palm tree embeds. Then pour a small amount into molds, about half the size of your intended soap bar [2 ounces or so]. Spritz away any bubbles with rubbing alcohol. Allow soap to harden slightly. Test this by touching it gently with your finger. The surface should be firm but you’ll feel a little give as it won’t be completely solid. Now add more of the mini palm trees. Pour the rest of the soap so that it covers them, although you can have it so the palm trees stick out! Allow to solidify. Once it’s hardened remove from the mold. Make sure soap is at room temperature before wrapping. Wrap in cling wrap and label.tropicalsoapbars

Learn more about soap crafting! Check out my book titles and articles here: soapmaking stuff

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Rooibos Tea and Pink Kaolin Shampoo Bar Recipe ~ New eBook + Excerpt

By Lisa Maliga, copyright 2015

Discover how to craft rebatch/hand-milled soap base into a unique and versatile shampoo bar for most hair types. Also includes a recipe for Rooibos tea and apple cider vinegar hair rinse.

Rooibos Tea and Pink Kaolin Shampoo Bar RecipeThis ebook began as a blog post…but it kept on getting longer and longer and longer! As I’m giving a recipe for a soap base that is somewhat different from melt and pour glycerin soap base, I feel as though more background information is needed.

I’m also seeing a plethora of nonfiction ebooks flooding online bookstores that, in some cases, are written by those with little to no knowledge of their topic. Therefore, for those of you who haven’t read any of my books or articles, I have actually made and sold shampoo bars, as well as soap and other bath and body products. I made my first bar of soap way back in 1998. I still maintain my Everything Shea Aromatic Creations website but no longer sell from it. If you look at it, www.everythingshea.com  you’ll see some of my articles about fine hair care, virgin coconut oil, moringa seed oil, etc. I believe in keeping people informed about natural soap and bath and body products.

For many years, I’ve successfully used shampoo bars. I formulate my own unique blends using hair-loving additives like jojoba oil, moringa seed oil, shea butter, goat’s milk, green tea, and Indian herbs such as amla, shikakai, and aritha. I’m not a cosmetologist. I don’t have a PhD in chemistry. I didn’t attend soapcrafting school. Everything I’ve learned has been done the old-fashioned way: by reading and by doing. I’ve invested loads of time and effort into learning all I can about crafting soap, whether it is glycerin melt and pour, or rebatching. When I first began working with rebatch soap, sometimes referred to as hand-milled soap, I wasn’t aware of the difference. I found out after waiting and waiting and waiting for it to melt in a one setting, one-quart crock-pot. Talk about slow! But that was how I began learning.

To pick up your  FREE copy of Rooibos Tea and Pink Kaolin Shampoo Bar Recipe, just visit these online book stores!
Amazon 
Amazon UK
B&N NOOK
Kobo

iTunes
Scribd
Smashwords

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Shopping for Soap Making or Bath & Body Products eBooks

Copyright 2014-2016

by Lisa Maliga

tapiocashampoobarKINCrafting books are always in demand, especially around the holiday season. In 2011, I published my first melt and pour soap crafting ebook. Since then, I’ve noticed a proliferation of other ebooks on all types of soap crafting methods, along with how to make other bath and body products. Many of them are written by authors who write about a variety of nonfiction topics.

Last month I was contacted by an author of a soap making book in search of a review. I was interested in seeing what types of soap it covered so I agreed to look at it. When I received the PDF copy, I noticed it had photos, always a plus, but the material seemed to be regurgitated. After reading it, I learned nothing new. Contacting the author to inquire about her soap making experience, I didn’t receive a response.

And that’s the problem with many of the newer titles; the author is just repeating facts they’ve either read online or in other books. Some of them aren’t avoidable, like the history of soap making, but others are. There have even been cases of ebooks that were “written” by authors who found content/recipes on websites, copied and pasted them into a file, and slapped their name on the content.

What I’d encourage you to do when buying nonfiction titles is to take a minute or two and see if the author is an expert in the field they are writing about. When it comes to soap, lip balm, lotions, perfume etc., see if they discuss how they make and/or sell the product[s]. If they don’t sell what they are writing about, then check to see how long they’ve been making the products.

MOREJOYmedOther tips on finding worthwhile ebooks:

~ How long is the book? Amazon posts an approximate page count, as do other online bookstores. Using the sample feature can give you a clue as to how long the book is, especially if it contains a table of contents. In fact, most nonfiction books should contain one.

~ What is the book’s price? Free. Well, why not take a chance if you have the room [and the time!] but for books priced at $0.99 and above, I’d recommend that you read the sample to see if it’s going to be of interest to you. Another gripe readers may have with a soap crafting book is that it might be about a different type of soap making technique than what they’re seeking. By checking out the sample you avoid downloading the “wrong” type of ebook.

~ Does the book include recipes? Does it only contain recipes? Are the recipes indicated by grams/ounces? Both? If it only contains recipes, does it give information that might be necessary such as safety tips, where to buy supplies, basic facts about soap and/or other body products? For those who make soap from scratch, recipes with accurate measurements are imperative as lye, oils, water and other additives must be carefully calculated.

~ Is a supplier/resource section included? I think it’s helpful to provide resources so that people can easily locate any of the ingredients that the author writes about. When I first began crafting melt and pour soap, I didn’t have any ebooks to read with lots of pictures and step by step instructions. Now all of us do, as there are many to choose from!

Shea Butter Soap Recipe

By Lisa Maliga
Copyright 2011-2014

shea butter melt and pour soapShea butter is a popular additive to soaps, lotions, creams, lip balms, shampoos, conditioners, and lotion bars. Why? The healing qualities of this African nut fat abound, helping those with dry skin, sunburn, minor skin irritations, and in just plain softening and conditioning the skin and hair. You can use either refined or unrefined shea butter in your soaps. You can also purchase a soap base with shea butter already included.

 

INGREDIENTS:
8 oz. opaque melt & pour soap base
1 teaspoon shea butter
1/2 teaspoon sweet orange essential oil

MOLD:
Two 4-oz. rectangle molds

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Slice up the opaque soap base into cubes.
2. Melt the shea butter and the soap in a double boiler OR crock pot.
3. Pour into molds.
4. Refrigerate or freeze until soap is hardened.
5. Unmold and allow to return to room temperature.
6. Wrap in cling wrap.
7. Label.

This recipe is from the eBook The Joy of Melt and Pour Soap Crafting.

Packaging Your Melt and Pour Soap

By Lisa Maliga

Copyright 2011-2016

Melt and pour glycerin soap should be wrapped in shrink wrap or plastic wrap. This is done for two reasons. 1. It preserves the moisture. 2. You can see the product. Although this slightly narrows your range of possibilities, packaging and labeling your handcrafted melt and pour soap doesn’t have to be boring. You can also use cling wrap in various colors and designs.

papaya nectar melt and pour soap

You can shrink wrap your soap with a special machine or with a heat gun used at the lowest setting. Personally, I haven’t ever used a machine to wrap my soap as I prefer the simple and economical method of using cling wrap and neatly taping the soap with a glossy finish tape.

pink gingham organza soap bag

You can have a theme to your soap such as floral, nautical, children’s, geographical, holiday, etc.  Once it’s wrapped in clear plastic, you can tie a ribbon or strip of fabric around the soap to decorate it. Muslin, organza and net coverings could be used. Your presentation can be as simple or ornate as you choose. The easiest way to present your soap is to include it in a gift basket. Add in other bath and body products such as lotions, shampoo, conditioner, comb and brush, powder, perfume, wash cloths/towels, a loofah mitt, etc. Gift baskets [or bags] are great for a theme. For example, a children’s gift basket can include toys, and your soap could be added in inventive ways such as having a teddy bear holding it or placing it in the back of a toy car or truck. 

This excerpt is from the book The Joy of Melt and Pour Soap Crafting

To see thousands of wonderful examples of soap packaging, visit the Talented Soapmakers board at Pinterest.

 

jelly baby melt and pour soap recipe

Jelly Baby Melt and Pour Soap Recipe

Copyright 2011-2017
by Lisa Maliga

The following recipe can be found in my eBook The Joy of Melt and Pour Soap Crafting. I’ve posted this recipe because it’s fun, easy and makes a nice springtime soap!

Went to the supermarket and discovered this 4-pack of colorful plastic gelatin molds. For $2 it was a great deal and they make some beautiful looking soaps.

jelly baby melt and pour soap by lisa maliga

Jelly Baby Melt and Pour Soap Recipe

Ingredients:

16 ounces clear soap base

Magenta mica

1 teaspoon strawberry fragrance

Mold:

4 four-ounce gelatin molds

Instructions: 

Slice up soap base into small cubes and melt. Just before it’s fully melted add colorant. Stir well. Add fragrance. Pour into molds. Spritz away any bubbles with rubbing alcohol. Allow soap to harden in fridge, freezer, or remain at room temperature. Remove from molds. Make sure soap is at room temperature before wrapping. Wrap in cling wrap and label. 

Want more recipes? Get a copy of The Joy of Melt and Pour Soap Crafting.

Looking for more articles, recipes, and eBooks? Check out my Soapmaking page.